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The Melvins – Hold It In

 BAND NAME – ALBUM NAME

Another album swept down from unknown jungles

Hold It In

The Melvins

Thanks to Melvins the musical persistence has always been heavily loaded and tested for elasticity. And when Buzz Osborne and Dale Crover make their mountains of madness with members of Butthole Surfers, genre variations are not to be neglected. After 2013 cover record Everybody loves Sausages, Hold It In allows every Melvins fanatic to cover himself with meat and wallow in mud – that’s how foolish and non-boring the result got out.

Classically and almost gently Bride of Crankenstein with its sludgy Doom and Buzz’s full-bodied bell voice slips on the back seat of a muddy jeep before you discover the second track You can make me wait – one truly stupid Soft Rock for wimps who dress in vocoder bathrobe and probably got stuck in the 90’s era of mediocre teen formations. After being convinced that it’s still the same band, Brass Cupcakes staggers around the corner in parody of 70’s Pop ‘n Roll. With Paul Leary on guitar and Jeff Pinkus on bass Melvins have found most adequate playmates for their tragicomedian activities that can be heard especially in songwriting and arrangement thereof. Spicy Onions Make The Milk Taste Bad which convinces with Southern guitars and Stoner Rock flair and the subsequent Eyes on You from old Clutch hymns times bring back memories of summer tavern-nights – just before you drunkenly slide off the set.

The innocent titled Sesame Street Meat contradicts its name and heavily tramples on the already bloody nose, Nine Yards’ Punk Rock is uncontrolled and dominated by Butthole Surfers duo and got its leg pulled due to targeted effects dragged through the mud in typical bad taste. Being the second longest track on the album with a length of over 7 minutes – The Bunk Up – makes use of probably most genres: hectic staccato rhythm that loses momentum, runs wild in an enchanted Shoegaze dream with accordion and finally returns back to Alternative Rock by Buzz ‘serious voice.

Ween-impregnated Roadhouse Blues I Get Along (Hollow Moon) would be an Elvis imitation almost socially acceptable if the Melvins Surfers hadn’t some gimmicks of grotesque twists in their repertoire which find an entertaining 12-minute end in House of Gasoline. As in 1993 Houdini, the closing track celebrates the band’s reputation as wielders of musical torture methods to transform consistently monotony into never-ending Industrial Noise.

Also in the 31 years of existence Melvins listeners obtain sovereignty spiked amusement that is still soaked in much debility and mischievous coolness. These components prove that Melvins are still the most present and most uncompromising underground band of the scene. Those who had no use for Melvins before, will find another emetic with Hold it in. Fans, however, may be as confused as I am but grateful for broaden horizons.

1. Bride of Crankenstein
2. You Can Make Me Wait
3. Brass Cupcake
4. Barcelonian Horseshoe Pit
5. Onions Make The Milk Taste Bad
6. Eyes On You
7. Sesame Street Meat
8. Nine Yards
9. The Bunk Up
10. I Get Along (Hollow Man)
11. Piss Pisstoferson
12. House of Gasoline

Running time: 53 min

You should listen to: Bride of Crankenstein, Eyes On You, The Bunk Up

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(1 votes, average: 7,00 out of 10)
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Brant Bjork and the Low Desert Punk Band – Black Power Flower

 Brant Bjork and the Low Desert Punk Band - Black Power Flower

Brant Bjorks multifaceted return as frontman

Black Power Flower

Brant Bjork and the Low Desert Punk Band

Almost four and a half years after the release of Gods & Goddesses and extensive touring and recording with Kyuss Lives / Vista Chino Brant Bjork (finally) returns to his guitar and microphone. Behind the somewhat clunky name Brant Bjork and the Low Desert Punk Band hides – yet again – an incestuous Desert-Rock supergroup. Alongside desert dwellers Dave Dinsmore, bassist of Ché and Fatso Jetson drummer Tony Tornay, the second guitar is played by Bubba Dupree, an east coast punk-rocker best known for his work in Void. The relaxed, groovy vibe of Gods & Goddesses has given way to a much more raw, fuzzy and doom-inspired sound on Black Power Flower.

This impression is already built up in the first seconds of the opener Contollers Destroyed. After a very slow and extremely heavy intro with Geezer-esque bass playing, one is almost tempted to chant the lyrics of War Pigs. The fuzzy guitar and Bjork’s rough, almost croaking singing however quickly brings the listener back to the arid desert ground. Also the listener immediately reckons in the first lines of the lyrics, that Bjork’s style of singing is different but the lyrics are socio-critical as always. We Don’t Serve Their Kind is a much more typical Brant Bjork song. Most of the track is driven by a brisk and infectious riff. Only after the second chorus the tempo gets reduced with an extended instrumental part. Again, Dinsmore lays down a furious and varied bass line that outshines the also respectable guitar solo of Dupree. For Stokely Up Now the Low Desert Punks turned up the Fuzz again, so that Bjork has to shout out loud in order to cope with the wall of instrumental power. The track surprises with a guitar lick in the chorus that would rather be expected in European Heavy-Psych (eg. Mother Engine). What follows with Buddha Time is a piece, which turns out far less suitable for ascetic meditation practices than the title suggests. Actually, the listener gets quite the opposite – a fine Fu Manchu-esque song. Beneath the wall of rhythm guitar and bass, Dupree plays a solo-like lead in the exact style of Bob Balch.

With Soldier of Love and Boogie Woogie On Your Brain the Low Desert Punks reach the short low point in their otherwise very strong. While the former is a solid Bjork-typical song, that would’ve been better with one or two minutes less in length, the latter completely fails to satisfy. The play with feedback, the confusing changes of sound between verses and chorus, as well as the brutal, superficial but unfortunately also simple drumming of Tornay doesn’t manage to convince – at least not the humble author of this review. In the first half of the record, the Fatso Jetson drummer disappoints a bit. Whoever has seen the band live in the last weeks, will attest that Tornay literally beats up his drum kit. Unfortunately that power fails to emerge on the final mix most of the time. But as if he noticed the doubt, he breaks loose of his chains in Ain’t No Runnin’ and suddenly plays much more free and light – a welcome change. Overall, the crisp, “Dr. Special “-like song functions revitalizing. The track provokes mellow head-whipping through a powerful, but at the same time groovy riff and his casual singing. This balancing act between heaviness and laid-backness is emphasized and mastered again in That’s A Fact Jack. In the verses, the fuzz-laden rhythm guitar stands back behind a playful, Wah-Wah-dripping lead just to tear everything down in the chorus. Only the powerful bass slides of Dinsmore provide some stability.

Hustler Blues is clearly divided into two parts, too – only this time the break is in the middle of the song. The first half gets on (almost completely) without fuzz and celebrates the blues with a bassy groove and Bjork’s reverb treated voice. On the chorus, in which Bjork is asking the more than appropriate question “How do you say no to a woman that makes you tea?”, follows a three-minute guitar solo, which could’ve come from Bruno Fevery’s hands (Vista Chino). Tornay seizes the reigns over the sprawling solo by successively increasing the tempo and force of his blows and turns the almost forgotten blues into a dirty and punky Hendrix tune. With more than eight minutes Where You From Man is the longest but also most simple song on Black Power Flower. This track is all about worshipping the riff. There is nothing wrong with that, when the riffs are so damn good. The lyrics, which are spoken during the main arrangement are constructed dialogically. Bjork repetitively asks his interlocutor with a spacey voice where he’s from. Usually he has to content himself with a laconic “Hell Yeah” or an sustained “Shiiiit” as response – the most satisfactory version is a “Not from here, man.”. In order to give the listener time to process this almost platonic dialogue, an approximately four-minute quieter part including a Wah-Wah solo is fitted in before the last return to the initial reef.

Overall, Brant Bjork and the Low Desert Punk Band have created a surprisingly heavy and fuzzy, yet varied album with Black Power Flower. Bjork embraces many influences from his post-Kyuss days (namely Fu Manchu, Ché, Vista Chino, solo) with this band and enriches them with Doom accents. At this place Dinsmore’s performance on the bass deserves a special praise. On the contentual and personal level, however, he seems to have remained completely true to himself – that is visible through the lyrics which are partly comedic, as on Keep Your Cool, but often socio-critical as on the Somera Sól. Close to this years end the Low Desert Punks have delivered a stunning album, which will be found in quite a few Top-10 lists of 2014.

1. Controllers Destroyed
2. We Don’t Serve Their Kind
3. Stokely Up Now
4. Buddha Time (Everything Fine)
5. Soldier of Love
6. Boogie Woogie On Your Brain
7. Ain’t No Runnin’
8. That’s A Fact Jack
9. Hustler’s Blues (not featured on the vinyl edition)
10. Where You From Man (not featured on the vinyl edition)

Running time: 49:21 min

You should listen to: We Don’t Serve Their Kind, Hustler Blues

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(10 votes, average: 8,60 out of 10)
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Best Of: Top5 Albums to Have Sex to (English)

top_5_records_to_have_sex_to

Click here for German version

Records you like to have sex to. The principle alone already proves itself difficult. At least when we are talking about the classic vinyl record. Eventually it does not help that you have to put on a record (honey, listen: Sex record! Let’s get naked), turn the record (after 15-20 minutes you are usually in the middle of business) and at the end you may even have to put on a second record (well that’s what people tell me at least). Even if you don’t let the needle gently caress the black gold (yes, there will be sexual innuendo all over the place), but rely on digital media, the albums choice is not necessarily easy at all.

In the best case an album for lovemaking is exciting, rhythmic, crazy and at the same time emotional and passionate. But it shouldn’t really distract either. Rather build up the atmosphere. Or should it be so loud that the neighbours can’t tell the difference between bass drum and bed frame? What do you think?

Like everyone of our lists you don’t have to take this too seriously but maybe someone will find his or her new go-to-record for screwing. Well, let’s make love, shall we?

Tims Top 5 – Sex Records
Ruths Top 5 – Sex Records

Tim   
  Mac_DeMarco-2_cover Mac DeMarco – 2 (2012)

Let’s face it, comparatively it doesn’t really matter what’s played in the background during sex. As long as it’s not necessarily Slayers Reign In Blood. To get in the mood or afterwards as a musical cigarette, an album definitely can add value to the surroundings. Mac DeMarco’s music often sounds like cheaply produced porn, in which the actors actually have too much character to fuck in front of a camera. Always with a twinkle in his eye, Mac is even able to generously spraying sex all over the place, when doing a tribute to a brand of cigarettes (Ode to Viceroy). Experimentation, while remaining comfortable. No wonder that DeMarco’s fanbase consists of a big set of pubescent teenagers.

  Yeah_Yeah_Yeahs-Show_Your_Bones_album Yeah Yeah Yeahs – Show Your Bones (2006)

Show Your Bones. Show yourself like you really are. A prompt, which you can follow during sex. Back in the days front lady Karen O was somehow punk, now the Yeah Yeah Yeahs tend to sound more like indie. And although the hardness and brilliance of the debut Fever To Tell (also a good, wild alternative for this list) has never been reached again, the rest of the discography convices with quality. if you observe early live performances of the band, Karen circulates lasciviously all over the ground or swallows the microphone. Quite suggestive and followed by groans, the vocal performance makes the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and especially their second album Show You Bones to a potential bombshell. It never really explodes, but it definitely can function as a catalyst for potentially good sex. The album is more beautiful than wild. Check it out.

  Marvin_Gaye-Lets_Get_It_On Marvin Gaye – Let’s Get It On (1973)

Well, I can put at least one obvious classic on this list, right? You’ll be able to find this record for dollar at the flea market. Therefore you’ll get side A and side B fully packed with sex, like maybe no other record. You know the tracks. I don’t have to tell you anything about them. I just would like to quote from the liner notes: “I can’t see anything wrong with sex between consenting anybodies. […] I content that Sex is Sex and Love is Love. When combined, they work well together, if two people are of about the same mind. […] Have your Sex, it can be very exciting, if you’re lucky.” With this record you don’t even need the stated luck.

  Moloko_Statues Moloko – Statues (2003)

I would like to have done you a favor and put something really dark or heavy on this list. But honestly, when you are surrounded by a blog for heavy underground rock, the heavy and the underground can sometimes make a detour around the bedroom. In this case, even the rock. The electronica-group aorund singer Róisín Murphy, no longer exists, unfortunately. At her prime time, however, you could see Goddess Murphy strutting with fiery red hair across the stage. She played with costumes, her voice, her fellow musicians, the audience and her sexuality. At their most accessible record Statues you can find besides quiet songs like I Want You or The Only Ones, also dramatic trip-hop beats (Forever More, Familiar Feeling) with great song structures.

  Portugal_The_Man-The_Satanic_Satanist Portugal, The Man – The Satanic Satanist (2009)

A sex album must not have one thing for sure. And that is a really incredibly shitty song that you would really need to just skip. The Satanic Satanist is an example for being good in it’s entirely. Okay, you, being a bad-ass stoner rocker, perhaps can’t comprehend the catchy indie summer songs of Portugal, The Man, but here’s a perfect foundation for any love cave. A feel-good album from beginning to end. Maybe a few rough edges would be appropriate at times. But what begins with vanilla sex, can indeed end with the needle constantly hanging at the end of the record, in an endless climax. Somehow scary though that I thought a long it is a woman singing in Portugal, The Man.




Ruth   
  Death from Above 1979_You're A Woman, I'm A Machine Death from Above 1979 – You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine (2004)

Canadian Synth-Punk duo Jesse F. Keller and Sebastien Graigner makes it best with its debut album: take amplifier over distorted bass riffs and a very charismatic singer-drummer who either yells at the thematized mistress or court her with his lascivious voice. You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine not only radiates pure eroticism and craziness, it especially awakens emotions where previously have been none and beats out truths and facts that always rested hidden in your inner core. And secretly as a female listener you wish nothing eagerly than being Sebastien Graigner’s worshipped one.

  Faith No More_Angel Dust Faith No More – Angel Dust (1992)

Basically each one of Mike Patton’s projects would be suitable for this Best of rating ‘cause the master of vocal acrobatics and sex appeal makes both little women and little men sweat thanks to his extravagant appearance and multiple talents. Angel Dust represents Faith No More’s musical milestone which they could never surpass and especially it was an album that threw around with aggressions, rhetorical questions and stylistic crossover thus the good and the bad part got most skillfully extracted.

  Acid Bath_Paegan Terrorism Tactics Acid Bath – Paegan Terrorism Tactics (1996)

Has Southern Metal ever sounded so sensual? Even if the lyrics of New Orleans most special band covered many taboo topics, the music’s sharpness and diabolic are wrapping one around the little finger that authentically and delicately. Dax Rigg’s vocal power dares hard jumps between Grunge and Death Metal and shoots up the inner boiling point similar to Mike Patton letting you feel the strong contrast between love and death on the skin. I feel the flowers screaming, to consume you (like murder). Earth and sky, your cradle. Earth and sky entomb you and death beside me.

  Led Zeppelin_Led Zeppelin II Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin II (1969)

Shake for me girl, I wanna be your backdoor man – which famous invitation can you be the lowest disobedient? Hip swing- asserter Robert Plant feeds on the flesh of himself or his sweetheart, so any attempt not to melt away seems useless and the handle to the wet towel is unalterable. Joy and sorrows of most mentioned topic of music history is converted by Led Zeppelin into aphrodisiac Rock n Roll and Heavy Rock and the pat on the buttocks found its allegory thanks to John Bonham’s Olympic percussion performance.

  The Raveonettes_Pretty in Black The Raveonettes – Pretty in Black (2005)

Indie-Pop with sassy attitude is not rare nowadays but Danish man-woman duo The Raveonettes fairly pours fuel to the fire in its sugary dream- ballads. Igniting Western guitars and Psychedelic ambitious basslines cling to smoochy Shoegaze and cream tart-Beatmusic. If The Everly Brothers are too corny, The Velvet Underground too bulky and Elvis Presley too breast hairy, Pretty in Black will offer you a cuddle- and part-time-rock record for rainy days when the down comforter and the cuddle partner of your choice play the most essential roles.